Work Life


Screen Shot 2017-07-05 at 12.30.33 PM.pngObviously, innovation is really important; we all know that. I’m fortunate to work at a company that not only values it as a core principle, but has also built a really legit employee program around it.

The Gist

The Innovation Challenge allows folks to creatively solve an existing problem or to expand into new opportunities. Bonus – it’s a great way to increase an employee’s visibility in the company. It goes something like this:

  • Form your team
  • Develop your idea
  • Submit your proposal
  • Pitch the panel
  • If selected, watch your idea happen (for real)

2017-06-07 09.31.53.jpgThis year I was lucky enough to be on the judging panel. ‘Lucky’ because I got to detach from meetings, emails, and memos (awesome) to watch employees at every level, from across the globe, share their ideas to enhance or grow the business that we all work for (super awesome).

Brave Moments at Work

Beyond the ideas themselves, was getting to watch people bravely walk into a room, some of whom have never done a presentation – let alone to executives, who used the platform to make their place of employment better. That takes guts and pride of ownership. For those of us who present on a daily basis, you can forget how nerve wrecking it can be. It was a great reminder that if you are talking about something you truly care about, the ‘presenting’ piece basically takes care of itself. The passion and innate subject matter knowledge shines through.

Challenge To Myself: Get Out and Listen More

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I’ve been climbing the career ladder so to speak since kindergarten. Making it to senior leadership has been incredibly rewarding and challenging; but if I’m being totally honest, it can also feel a bit isolating. That’s why I really appreciated being a judge this year. It afforded me the unencumbered time to listen to colleagues at every level around the business. Of course the business is better for it, but so am I personally. I listened, I learned, I pondered, I got energized, and I got inspired.

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WCET Webcast Recap from Thursday, April 20, 2017

Strategic Portfolio Development (SPD) is a forward-thinking program planning approach that helps institutions position themselves to more efficiently operate in today’s market while preparing for tomorrow’s. It identifies the most strategic and scalable market-centric digital program anchors, concentrations and certificates to create a series of “suites” that build off of each other, interconnecting current and future content and program areas.

Benefits of the Strategic Portfolio Development Approach

The modular nature of this approach provides schools the ability to attract a larger section of the market to their digital offerings, maximize their use of resources, quickly increase their number of market interesting programs offered and ultimately grow a more robust and long-lasting digital presence.

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Panel Speakers

How SPD Works:

SPD involves analyzing trends in the market and understanding where the educational gaps and opportunities exist, not just to identify students, but also to help students prepare for jobs. By doing this, institutions can build efficient, flexible, and relevant online curriculums.

Connect with Wiley Education Services to learn more.

SPD helps institutions:

  • Maximize the courses they offer.
  • Quickly address changes in the market, without having to redesign an entire program.
  • Bridge outcomes with workforce expectations.
  • Identify employment needs/gaps to offer programs that will provide students with strong employment opportunities after graduation.
  • Make program planning and development more efficient.
  • Increase enrollments as students often prefer programs that allow them to focus on a specific, market relevant, specialization.

Strategic Portfolio Development – A Marketer’s Point of View

The approach of Strategic Portfolio Development influences marketing in two main ways:

  1. First, is the University’s value story in the market place
  2. Second, is the economic benefit to the marketing budget

Let’s start with unpacking how a University builds its value story. We have things like history, mission and credentials – these are long established macro-level brand ingredients. The value story is further made by factors that are rapidly evolving – program differentiation, outcomes, and the online environment itself.

The Intersection of Institutional Competency and Today’s Student Journey.

So where does Strategic Portfolio Development come in to this? In effect, it helps the school become a center of excellence in a set of scalable disciplines, which in turn, helps build competitive differentiation. While SPD has great internal benefits for the school, it’s also a student-centric approach. I like to say that it’s the intersection of institutional competency and today’s student journey. When an institution can market a depth of experience that gives students meaningful choices, the value story further grows in the marketplace.

At Wiley, our strategic marketing direction starts with a solid understanding of the product portfolio and the markets it can serve. We’re immersing ourselves in the university brand and looking to understand the in-depth details of the programs. A competitive analysis is paired with this information to provide perspective on the landscape. It gives us a feel for where to position the program, department, or university at large, that allows for market differentiation. As much as I’ve used the word market differentiation, it’s most meaningful if that is arrived at from the student’s perspective. Gone are the days of using course catalog descriptions to sufficiently describe the program. Gone are the days of the online modality being unique. Students want to know the outcomes and the ROI. If there’s a set of related choices that can better speak to the nuanced need of a chosen career path, it helps build confidence.

Impacts the Efficiency and Scale of Budget

Let’s move on to the way Strategic Portfolio Development impacts the efficiency and scale of budget.

At The Onset of Research, Not Every Student Knows Exactly Which Degree to Pursue

Sometimes there’s an assumption that every graduate student knows exactly which program they want to pursue. The reality is, many of the initial searches higher up in the funnel are very broad. Students start looking for program comparisons. This often leads to uncovering a specialization, or even a different program, that the student didn’t know existed. I’ll give you an example. I was recently looking at search index that compared the terms ‘accounting masters’, ‘accounting MBA’ and ‘business masters’. On average, there’s 76% more searches for the broad term ‘business masters’ than searches for an ‘accounting masters’. And, ‘accounting master’s has 147% more searches than typing in ‘accounting MBA’. {for all you data scientists, I know you can slice the data in infinite ways and there’s conversion impacts at every level – this stat is to help get a broad point across}.

Now let’s imagine that the school could compete with any of these phrases. That’s exactly what happens with SPD if there’s a program suite that can be co-marketed today. Even if it’s messy internally because the programs come out of different colleges, there is real strength in marketing relevant choices together. Instead of building many one-off marketing assets that support a single program, you can consolidate. The speed to market is quicker because you can add a tangential option to an existing set of assets and marketing campaigns rather than start from scratch. From a paid media perspective, digital marketing efforts can be initially targeted to a larger audience which can result in a lower cost-per-inquiry.

See a Real Example of SPD in Action

Check out the WCET Webinar to see how this plays out in Scranton’s real world portfolio example. In the marketing section, we talk about how to market at the individual program level while bringing down costs in aggregate by marketing the suite at large. Market demand then dictates how inquiries shake out by program.

At Wiley, we underpin this strategy with sophisticated media technology that allows performance targeting and conversion modeling – but that’s a webinar for a different day.

What’s a Pacesetter?

Deltak A Wiley BrandWiley’s Pacesetter Awards program honors colleagues who have made significant contributions to Wiley’s success. They are issued semi-annually on a fiscal year basis at the individual and team level. I’m so excited to share that I’m one of two recipients at the individual level. Did I mention that Wiley is global! Do you know how amazing it feels to have your company advocating for you like that?

 Winners are chosen for achieving one or more of the following criteria:

  • Significant impact on Wiley’s financial results and/or strategic goals
  • Identification of opportunities that result in acquisitions, partnerships, joint ventures or alliances
  • Significant cost savings/expense reduction
  • Resolution of critical problems and obstacles to achieving goals; responsiveness to unforeseen circumstances
  • Outstanding technological innovation that increases revenue and/or reduces cost
  • Outstanding creative effort
  • Extraordinary level of intra-company service through demonstration of professional capability, strong interpersonal relations, cooperation and helpfulness
  • Extraordinary level of external customer service and leveraging of sales through customer relationships
  • Significant improvements in products, processes and workflow, or quality orientation (should result in increased revenue or reduced costs)
  • Other achievements or results involving specific objectives, projects, activities or tasks which significantly advance progress towards department, business or company goals

So what are my thoughts on all this?

Reflections From an Overachiever

High performers need their tenacious drive and skill to be cultivated, nurtured and course-corrected to reach their maximum potential. Coming to Deltak has provided that in so many ways. I am surrounded by incredibly talented folks from whom I am learning so much from. It’s been a foundation for growth and a catalyst for mentorship upstream, down and peer-to-peer.

Since day 1, I have felt empowered and championed for across the entire organization – which has in turn cemented my  commitment to our collective success. The standard for performance is high at Deltak, but what I find so compelling is the intangible dedication to professional development. It goes beyond formal reviews; it unfolds every single day organically by the culture (for those who seek it). This seems like a good stopping point to plug this quote:

“We need to stop telling [women], “Get a mentor and you will excel.” Instead, we need to tell them, “Excel and you will get a mentor.”
― Sheryl SandbergLean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead

I am also acutely aware that there is no story to tell without the efforts of my entire team. Whether they’ve helped me develop our strategic direction, or activated upon it with passion and commitment, the results are indicative of our collective strength.

Are you in a leadership role?

If yes, then I encourage you to truly invest in the talent around you. I am the byproduct of so many people investing in my academics, career and character over the years – and Lord knows there’s been a lot of course correction needed! Those hallway conversations, random phone calls, late night skype sessions, impromptu brainstorms, 1:1 meetings and informal mentoring make a really big impact on folks.

Are you the spouse or partner of a woman in leadership?

I know it feels like I’m doling out some sort of Oscar speech. Believe me, I’m not taking myself too seriously here. It’s just that the recognition has given me some time to reflect on my path. This is where I have to give thanks to my #1 supporter – my husband Cam.

“When it comes time to settle down, find someone who wants an equal partner. Someone who thinks women should be smart, opinionated and ambitious. Someone who values fairness and expects or, even better, wants to do his share in the home. These men exist and, trust me, over time, nothing is sexier.”
― Sheryl SandbergLean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead

During my tenure as Director of Client Services at Intellavia, I led quite a few e-learning projects. It’s evident that online learning has not only gained momentum, but has indefinitely secured its place as a leading knowledge-transfer vehicle. Projects ranged from financial association credentialing courses to hospitality courses for travel agents to adequately sell and role play.

This post refers to an interesting project aimed at young students. I was heavily involved in every aspect of the coursework and then developed the PR surrounding its launch. Here’s an excerpt…..

Commercial construction veterans Timothy H. Bernardi and Jose D. Amaya selected the orlando-based multimedia experts at Intellavia to create a unique construction simulation e-learning platform.

BUILDING THE BUILDING is a web-based, interactive education program teaching the fundamentals of commercial construction project management to a middle school thru high school audience. Using a rich multimedia environment and a challenging Construction Simulation Experience, students are introduced to commercial construction – learning the language of the trade and gaining an understanding about the day to day challenges that come with the management of a commercial construction project.

To bring the concept to life, the BUILDING THE BUILDING (BTB) team turned to Intellavia, a company with a proven track record in developing software programs that combine target-appropriate graphic design with high functioning usability. Though important with all digital communication initiatives, e-learning programs (in particular) require a well thought out user experience. BTB owners Timothy H. Bernardi and Jose D. Amaya conveyed their real-world wealth of process driven knowledge to Intellavia to create a multi-media knowledge transfer that would resonate with youngsters, teachers and the construction industry as a whole.

“Our goal was to create a young person’s guide to commercial construction project management, ” commented Timothy H. Bernardi, a BTB partner. “The cornerstone of the Building the Building program is its academic credibility.”

Jose D. Amaya continued, “The program’s content has drawn from our professional experience in commercial construction. We’ve just completed the demo and are now engaging Intellavia to build out additional portions of the program.”

The simulation demo is complete and the phase 2 academic portion is in progress. Once the full program is deployed, students will receive a comprehensive evaluation of their performance.

VIEW DEMO


Building the Building – An Introduction to Commercial Construction Project Management ™ Copyright 2011. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction of this demo by any means without the consent of Timothy H. Bernardi is prohibited. Contact timothybernardi@buildingthebuilding.com. Please Note: This edition of Building the Building – An Introduction to Commercial Construction Project Management™ has been published for demonstration purposes only.

Executive Summary

The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) officially granted Florida Hospital for Children Magnet Recognition status, as part of its Magnet Recognition Program®, which honors hospitals for excellence in nursing. The Magnet designation makes the Walt Disney Pavilion the only hospital in Central Florida to receive this prestigious recognition. Moreover, only seven percent of the nation’s hospitals have earned this distinction. The Magnet Recognition Program honors the outstanding contributions of patient care clinicians as demonstrated through excellence achieved in leadership, clinical practice, innovations and positive outcomes. In addition to the Magnet recognition, Florida Hospital for Children was also cited for exemplary status in six areas, including community and educational partnerships, and analysis and tracking of nurse satisfaction.

The Challenge

In previous years, the 700+ pages of the documented submission were compiled and delivered in hard copy format. For efficiency, the hospital wanted to streamline the delivery process without sacrificing quality or the incredible amount of hard work that goes into preparing the tangible documents and meticulous compilation of corresponding resources.

The Solution

Intellavia was contracted as the technology partner that developed the electronic version of the Magnet submission to the ACNN. Intellavia quickly understood the magnitude of the project and worked closely with the Magnet Leadership Team to ensure all technical requirements were met. This included developing a highly-organized content delivery system with an index that followed all guidelines – along with a one-click PDF export for printing. There were over 700 pages of text and nearly 500 corresponding resources and digital assets.

Results

Intellavia leveraged the proven techniques and philosophy of User-Centered Design (UCD) to create effective web-based business solution. At the heart of this, and every project, was ensuring usability goals were met – a critical undertaking with the organization of 700+ pages of content. Ultimately, Intellavia created a highly searchable, user-intuitive, secure and protected website to deliver materials validating the outstanding contributions of patient care clinicians at Florida Hospital for Children.

Multimedia Links

Client: Florida Hospital Foundation
Campaign: Generosity Heals
Media Vehicles: Short and long format testimonial videos as well as written testimonials for print and web.

Here is a behind the scenes look at the copywriting process and how it translates to the finished piece.

Generosity Heals Testimonial Videos 

To see how the content development process captured the campaign objectives on camera, click on each name below to see the finished videos. To see how this project translated to the written word, check out the full length testimonial samples.

Dr. Joseph Allgeier

Joseph Allgeier, DO is Director of Medical Residency at Florida Hospital, as well as the Medical Director of Shepherd’s Hope. Moreover, he regularly oversees medical mission trips and many community outreach programs.

Read full length testimonial 

Dr. Jenni Yoon

Dr. Yoon is the medical director of women’s imaging services at Florida Hospital. She is also a clinical assistant professor of radiology at Florida State University College of Medicine. The Jennie Yoon Buchanan M.D. Breast Cancer Fund was created because of her passion for providing quality care and helping those affected by breast cancer – including her sister who is now in remission.

John Davis

John Davis is a board member on the Florida Hospital Foundation. His generosity has helped meet many special needs, such as creating The Ellie Davis Family Area. John is the recipient of the Philanthropist of the Year Award.

Van Firios

A rapidly expanding tumor nearly cost Van Firios the use of his arm. At the time, he was serving our country and nothing was more important to him than being in peak physical condition. Florida Hospital saved his arm and he returned to defending America.

Claire Frenkel

At the age of four, Claire Frenkel was diagnosed with Primitive Undifferentiated Sarcoma in her tonsils. She was one of the first children to be treated at Florida Hospital Cancer Institute when it opened its doors in 1997.

The Gibbons Family

Many refer to the Gibbons as “the miracle family”. Their true and inspiring story recounts the pain and heartache of several life-threatening medical challenges and describes the wondrous triumphs and victories they encountered at Florida Hospital.

Read full length testimonial 

Alan Ginsburg

In 2007, The Alan Ginsburg Family Foundation gave Florida Hospital $20 million — the largest donation in its history — for its new $255 million patient tower. The 15-story, 440-bed Ginsburg features one of the largest emergency departments and cardiac catheterization labs in the country. The tower’s lobby was designed to be welcoming to people of all faiths and features a memorial to Ginsburg’s late wife, Harriet, and son, Jeffrey, who both died in a plane crash in 2002.

Lucille O’Neal

Lucille O’Neal has been a patient and philanthropist for Florida Hospital in a variety of capacities. Her gratitude to God for His mercy, grace and abundant blessing on the lives of her family has motivated her passion to help others that are less fortunate. Because of a deeply personal connection to premature babies, she is participating in the NICU ‘baby cuddler’ volunteer program.

Martie Salt

WFTV evening news anchor Marie Salt became a ‘grateful daughter’ when her father suffered a massive stroke and received expert care at Florida Hospital. During his inpatient stay, she witnessed compassionate whole-person healing that addressed her dad’s mind, body and spirit and was consequently moved to give back.

Benji Watson

14 year old Benjamin Watson was diagnosed with non-Hodgkins B-cell lymphoma. He recently completed his last round of cancer treatment at the Florida Hospital Cancer Institute. During his stay, Ben urged his family to create a program through the Foundation to help other cancer-stricken children whose families are struggling to pay for the many incidental costs associated with hospitalization.

Client: Florida Hospital Foundation
Service: Copywriting for Trifold Brochure
Campaign: “Generosity Heals”
Desc: Patient Testimony
Project Overview: Project started with me interviewing the family one-on-one and asking them questions that I developed to create their story. From there, I listened to the audio file of the interview to draft the text in support of Florida Hospital Foundation’s campaign entitled: Grateful Patients.

“My heart goes out to those who are suffering from any illness, but I highly encourage you to never give up. Trust that your time of healing will come.” If anyone is able to passionately convey these words, it’s Ivana Gibbons – wife and mother of what many refer to as “the miracle family”. Their true and inspiring story recounts the pain and heartache of several life-threatening medical challenges and describes the wondrous triumphs and victories they encountered at Florida Hospital.

It all started with Gabriella, the oldest child, who was born via emergency c-section 14 weeks premature. New dad Michael Gibbons was faced with every new parent’s worst fears. “I had been conditioned by movies to believe that the doctor’s delivery of news of a recent birth was always a joyous occasion. I will never forget the first words the neonatologist told me – ‘your daughter has a 50% chance of survival and she weighs only 1 pound 10 ounces’.” Gabriella was placed in the level III NICU at Florida Hospital, where she stayed for 3 months. The doctors, nurses and clinical staff became like a second family. Their trust in the medical team and strong faith carried them through and their prayers were answered with Gabriella finally coming home.

Several years later, Gabriella became a big sister to Rafaella, another beautiful daughter who was luckily born after an uneventful pregnancy. When news of a third pregnancy revealed a son would soon join the family, the Gibbons were ecstatic. But the excitement would soon end when Elijah, the youngest child, was diagnosed with a large tumor at 17 weeks gestation. “Our Florida Hospital perinatologist told us to ‘keep praying whatever you are praying’ and that’s exactly what we did”, commented Michael. After being given a 50% chance of survival, Elijah was born at 34 weeks with a football-sized tumor. “Right before surgery, I leaned down and felt the warm soft skin of my son’s abdomen on my lips. Then they rolled him into the operating room and I was left to pace the floor wondering whether that kiss would be our last”. Fortunately, their prayers were once again answered and that kiss turned out to be the first of many.

11 months after Elijah’s tumor was successfully removed, Ivana – who at the time was a 37-year-old healthy mother of three young children – suffered a debilitating stroke. Though she knew something was very wrong, she was surprised to hear the diagnosis. “How can I have a stroke at such a young age”, she wondered. Ivana was transferred to the neurological wing of Florida Hospital, where she had to learn basic skills like walking and eating all over again. “At the time I was not sure how, but I knew I had to come home to my children. So, I put my faith in God’s healing powers and trusted my medical team as I had done so many times before.” At the time of her discharge, her body was weak but the spirit within her was strong, and so with hard work and months of rehabilitation, she overcame yet another major obstacle.

Gabriella and Rafaella are both now honor roll students who delight in playing dress up, Elijah is an adventure seeker with a heart of gold; Ivana is engaged as a full time home maker and Michael continues to practice law as a partner at a commercial law firm. Collectively, they are grateful patients who truly understand the power of faith. For this reason, they give back to Florida Hospital in support of the organization’s mission to extend the healing ministry of Christ. “Through the transforming challenges that we experienced, we learned the meaning of faith, hope and love. We hope we can inspire others to have strength despite long medical odds.”

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